Modern Cabin with Floor-to-Ceiling Windows Floats in the Trees

Nestled in the woods of Northeastern Minnesota, Jewel Box Cabin takes full advantage of the spectacular view of Caribou Lake. And while modest in terms of square footage, this modern cabin boasts tall ceilings, exposed beams, floor-to-ceiling windows and doors, and a thoughtful balance between public and private spaces that creates an impression of volume and breadth.

Sara Imhoff, owner and founder of Imprint Architecture and Design, worked closely on this project with homeowners Daniel and Elizabeth and their daughter Emily. Uninterested in a traditional north woods log cabin and with a fondness for the design styles commonly found in the Pacific Northwest, Imhoff’s clients wanted to push boundaries.

After touring Imhoff’s newly designed home on the AIA MN Homes By Architects tour, the homeowners were already familiar with her Seattle architectural roots. Designs for their new cabin were forefront. “The homeowners were looking for a sense of being in a space that faces outward, into the natural forest and setting – that was their goal. Those concepts are often found in the Pacific Northwest design style.” Imhoff added.

The aesthetic feel was important, but so was utility. Imhoff’s clients wanted a simple and uncomplicated interior that utilized every inch of the 900 square feet. On the main floor, the powder room, mechanical room, storage space and laundry are separated from the great room by one huge sliding plywood door. This replaces the need for multiple doors, which saves space and maintains material sightlines and a sense of openness. The bedrooms are located on the second floor, which provides some privacy from the great room located below. With multi-purpose space in mind, Imhoff added a flex space that serves as an office or sitting area but can also accommodate guests.

The roof structure, built with exposed architectural grade fir wood beams, handles heavy Minnesota snow loads. Plywood runs on the lower ceiling from the front porch into the interior hallway and through to the back porch. “The plywood we used was pine,” Imhoff says. “It has a light feel compared to the traditional half-round log-sided cabin. The homeowners have two dogs, one Samoyed and one Newfoundland. Plywood is a durable material that won’t be damaged when two big, active dogs brush up against it. Plywood also provides a bit of texture and contrast from what would normally be standard drywall.”

See full article and additional images here.

Jewel Box Cabin project

IMAGE CREDITS

Imprint Architecture and Design, LLC and James Kruger of Landmark Photography

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